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 Post subject: Your Best D&D Experience
PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 10:14 am 
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What was your best D&D experience?


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 Post subject: Re: Your Best D&D Experience
PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 4:46 pm 
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In the campaign i was in, we were in our 16-17th level. in my party was a dragonborn paladin, a dragon fire adept, a master of the nine swords, a multiclass kolbold, a npc cleric and me a warlock. we were warriors of bahumut and traveled to a city in war with the army of red dragons. nothing but airships and powerful magic. our dm told us about how the worlds red dragon has prepared an attack for this city. but our group were not for any sides but for the good. we sat on an island where the dragons have established a camp. on that island was a silver dragon resting from the world. we told him of the situation of the outside world and he contacted his brothers and sisters. the battle has started. harpoons and fire breath weapons exchanged sides. you could hear the screaming voices of the battle ships and the death cry of the dragons. we took to our hands and flew high to the capital ship of the fleet and began battle with the crew. the enemy was set up in a small group of 10 by 10 space. our pally used his cleave feat to take out multiple units. our nine swords uses epic actions to drop his enemies. both me and the fire adept uses our cone weapons(warlock = eldritch cone, dfa = breath weapon) to deal damage to the masses. as the battle rages on, more ships and dragons were being destroyed. untill a red dragon began to attack both us and the capital ship. we then flew away and began an fighting in the sky. our beefy pally, crit on the dragon with his vorpal axe and instantly drop the head of the beast. we knew it was time to leave because both sides had heavy losses and that the silver dragons came for the finishing kill. the city army was defeated and about 15% of the red dragons on the world survived the battle and fled away. we took our leave and felt we had help the world by destroying tiamat's children. our party then celebrated on our ship and moved to a new ruin to finish our quest.


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 Post subject: Re: Your Best D&D Experience
PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 7:52 pm 
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Firstly, I am one of the anomalies who has never played a game of D&D not behind the DM screen. So my story comes from the DMs vantage point - and to be fair there are tons of great experiences in my history of playing but this one jumped to mind first:


I had been running my first home-made campaign for four months and the story was rounding itself to an end. As it turned out other commitments prevented all but two of my players from attending my last session so I brewed up something extra special that worked best for two players.

First I had them jump through hoops of the dimensional traveling variety to chase down a set of artifacts related to an object they had claimed from the corpse of the evil sorceress the session before. The got themselves caught up in the middle of a battle between the two Gith races on the Chaos Place - which was a rather amusing encounter with all of the terrain changing and Gith insanity, especially when the mind flayer showed up.

To make a long story short and get to the real exciting part they survived and got out with the pieces of the artifact they needed. So now they had a single flat tile with a circular piece in the middle missing and a handful of pieces that had swirls and lines and dots in various colours marking them. I had actually made the artifacts and handed them the pieces and they spent the next hour trying to put the puzzle together. Once it was assembled the runes on the tile made by the different colours were distinguished. Only one of them was familiar - which turned out to be the symbol of Boccob, the uncaring one, and the God of magic.

With a little more tinkering they managed to decipher the runes that circled the outside of the tile. They were an incantation -- which was written with English characters and a simple encryption (I shifted the letters over three so, for example, a became d) -- which caused a special gate to open before them. Of course they entered, with great reluctance (I had previously punished jumping into random portals earlier in the campaign).

They found themselves in a small beautifully made room of golden colour stone and marble. There were two pillars are one door. The rest of this area was a series of room each containing a single puzzle that needed to be solved to move to the next and the clue to solving the puzzle was found on the tile they had brought with them. Each of the different colours of runes on the tile was in it's own way a clue to how to solve a puzzle. For instance, one puzzle involved placing tiles onto a tablet in a certain order and the symbols on the tiles were identical to the blue symbols on the artifact. They only got to attempt each puzzle once, and I was pleased to see they succeeded on each one.

Finally they found themselves in the final room - a vast library which seemed to have infinite dimensions as the shelves that held everything from books to strange looking objects that radiated magical auras reach outward from the central area beyond their eyes limited sight. The library was in fact infinitely large as it was Boccob's personal library in which was contained the original of every single book, device and magical contraption to have even been dreamt of. Sitting at the center of the room on a raised pedestal and held in a single golden claw was the Staff of the Magi.

The rogue reached forward to collect it and there was a sudden booming noise as a crackling sound filled the air around it. She pulled back and stared as light seemed to bend to make a sort of temporal gateway and an elderly man with a long white beard strode through the air as if it were a door and greeted them with a grin. He introduced himself as Boccob and congratulated them on finding his secret library - something never intended for mortal eyes. The scene proceeded forward and they learned there was once an all powerful mage who tried to usurp the God and it was he who had created the key to reach the puzzle chambers, which Boccob had created on a whim of ingenuity as a kind of protective measure to ensure if anyone arrived in his library they would at least have to be worthy.

Boccob then offered them a sort of prize, they could either have a Staff of the Magi - not the original but an exact copy of it - or something else of which he would not tell them what it was. The rouge took the staff, and the sorceress - who refused to allow herself to hold such great power as she knew how it would corrupt her - took the unknown treasure. Boccob nodded once and in that instant the Rogue awoke in her own house and in her wardrobe found her staff, though she could not recall how she got it she knew exactly what it was and how it worked. The Sorceress found herself in an altogether strange dimension of purple glowing lights and transparent blue platforms, strange white birds that resembled fish and swam through the midnight blue sky and upside down waterfalls that originated from no where and poured into nothing. She had become a God of the realms and this was her personal plane, created from her desires and dreams.

It was a very awesome session in which I got to partake in some awesome roleplaying as Boccob while the players discussed the potential rewards and tried bargaining with him, and got to see them and their satisfaction as they passed each of my (rather difficult) puzzles. And even though they did not get to play again with those characters the final rewards made everything worthwhile in a way only possible in a game of DnD.


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 Post subject: First and Favorite Game
PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 8:22 pm 
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The first campaign I ever played in has my favorite moment in D&D. It was 2nd Ed. and I was playing the party's second wizard. I joined a couple weeks and so was level one while everyone else was playing something powerful and cool; my DM let me know a single spell. I knew Shatter. This left me basically having to use a dagger and join in most fights with the fighter because my DM didn't allow shatter to work on must of anything. I tried to use it on someone's armor, and it only broke a small piece, having no effect on THAC0. The higher level wizard always refused to let me learn spells from his cause I didn't know the game, and he wouldn't help me until I learned how to properly make use of the magic I had.

About 2 or 3 weeks into the game the higher level wizard player brought his new girlfriend who although was 19, looked and acted like a 12 year old. Two weeks of playing and all we heard was how she could do a better job storytelling than our DM, so he finally let her run the story for a week so he could play.

The story consisted of us finding a small compact (make up holder) that when we opened it and touched the large gem in the frame of the mirror opened a portal to a magical realm. The entire world was made of bright and shiny crystals. The sky itself was made of a gemstone, and reflected brightly. Nothing but happy fairies and pixies lived here and they all wanted to tell us of these great stories and how we were legendary heroes summoned to help them. We listened as to how they needed us to help fix a great evil and how their kingdom was peaceful and wonderful and so SOOO happy. We met with the fairy queen, and she told us how grateful she was to have us, and how we needed to help at once, and "Told of the story of their problem that we quickly fixed” And then were thanked over and over and asked to leave.

It was at this point we started to ask to go back to the "quest" we were on, and how she sort of had been talking about the crystal fairy realm and describing how happy it was, and all the fairies, that she didn't tell us actually what the problem was, or how we even fixed it much less did we choose to do anything, role-play, or role dice. She got upset and I asked if you lose any arrows or spells or hit points on this great quest and she told us no, so be happy. They took us to the portal out and told us we could return at any time to as their heroes. We all thanked them and said goodbye and after we all went back through the portal I asked if I could stick my head back in to say goodbye and she said yes.

"I cast shatter on the sky” I said.

"You what?" She replied with a look of confusion.

"I am casting shatter on the sky. You said their entire world was a giant connected gemstone, and the sky itself was part of that and completely made up of gemstone, well Chicken Little, the sky is exploding and falling down." I replied.

At this point, or normal DM jumped up and said, "You cast shatter on the sky, and barely pull your head out of the portal before the world collapses and is destroyed. The compact mirror breaks at the point and the whole thing falls apart, you gain a full level for destroying an entire plane of existence," and then turning at the girlfriend "And your story sucked."

After that I never had problems learning spells from the other wizard, although his girlfriend never came back to game... Still it's not every day you destroy a world.


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 Post subject: Re: Your Best D&D Experience
PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 9:39 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 30, 2008 8:59 pm
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Well I would have to say that my best D&D experience came from the first campaign anyone in my group had ever played. We all started off as low level characters who tracking down a group of Orcs that has just made a raid on a near by village kidnapping a few children. We were (actually my barbarian was) following the tracks which wound up along side a field with a cave. Well sitting in the field was a white rabbit. Being the brilliant and mighty fighter my brother (a big Monty Python fan)was he decided to go kill this rabbit for a stew. Well we all know were this is going, but as soon as he entered the field this white rabbit jumped up an bit my brother's fighter in the neck with giant fangs. At which point the rest us had gone hysterical and my brother was is in a state of shock cause he hadn't seen it coming. The DM looked at us while trying hard not to smile and said, "Well I know none of you have any Holy Hand Grenades. So what are you going to do?" My brother wound up ripping the rabbit from his throat and running while the rest of us stood off aways and killed it with arrows blessed by our cleric of Pelor. Now every time we get together for a session and end up near a cave we always check for rabbits.


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 Post subject: Re: Your Best D&D Experience
PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 2:19 am 
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Let me start off by explaining I have a diverse group of players. I have your requisite powergamer, more stats more happy, but not averse to RP xp if you take my meaning. Then you I have a die-hard roleplayer the most fun for this guy is the RP. I have a new player, and a guy who just likes to do the most insane thing he can think of in a given situation and see if he lives.

I want to run a Planescape converted to 3e, but I want all of the PCs to be completely ignorant of the planes (my players really are). The adventure hook is that the king's "sacred flowers" are being stolen. I tell them the flowers are called Opal Lotus and describe the opium plant. I thought I'd made it easy to figure out the thieves were using the flowers as a portal-key, but it took my player's awhile to figure it out.. they set traps for the thieves, caught and killed some, but always there were more thieves. My players were getting very frustrated and I'm starting to worry maybe I'm not so good a DM. Finally, the players figure out the portal key, and walk through into a massive warehouse filled with wooden crates. I tell them "You see a group of men clad like the bandits eating in the middle of the warehouse. They reach for swords and shout as they notice you. You have a surprise round." In the event of a surprise round I let my player's choose initiative. They choose the most frustrated person, playing a Druid to go first. "I cast flamestrike on them!" The area of flamestrike is not small, and so of course the warehouse catches on fire. Now I've never DMd before but I'm guessing inhaling the smoke from a giant opium warehouse is some sort of fortitude save. I ask for fortitude saves every round of combat, starting DC5 and going up 5 each time. Finally every bandit and player is passed out or loopy on opium smoke except the Druid who ends up having to drag everyone out of the burning warehouse. I never get to play on the other side of the DM screen anymore. Proof that you can please all of the people some of the time... especially with drugs.


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 Post subject: Re: Your Best D&D Experience
PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 10:51 am 
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So here's my best experience. We were a 6-7th level party. Our home town had been taken over my an evil necromancer while we were gone, and an army on undead roamed the streets. So my party finally comes back to town after hearing the news. We are about to charge through and try to fight to the necromancer, when we are ambushed. Each of us is hit with an arrow that instantly puts us to sleep. We wake up in a building outside of the town. When we finally get to exploring we meet a cleric who lived in the town and find out we are at a safehouse. There is a plan to take the town back and we are the final piece. My party is to sneak through an underground path that leads to the necromancers tower as the rest of the people in the safehouse serve as a distraction, assaulting the front gate. So we do this and eventually get to the tower. When we emerge from underground, we find that the rest of our companions have already fought to the tower, and are in the large chamber we come to. They tell us to keep going while they hold off the hoards coming through. We head to the top of the tower and meet our foe. He was powerful and he had the help of 2 boneclaws. Finally we managed to defeat him, though not kill him. Just before we decided to end him the most surprising thing happened. A portal opened and a mind flayer stepped out. We discovered him as the mastermind behind the attack. After eating the necromancer's brain for his failure, he transported our cleric (who was an npc) to his hold. He told us to seek him out if we wanted him back, and that he knew something important about my character. Than he left. We still haven't found him, but are getting closer.


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 Post subject: Re: Your Best D&D Experience
PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 10:59 am 
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Here's another that rivals my first, but is not as long. So we are in the capital city of out land, and are shopping. We come to a allyway and a man in a bluish coat and red eyes steps out and says "Over here stranger." We decide to follow him and he offers to sell us the chance to draw a card from a varient Deck of many things for 50 gold a draw. We accept gratefully. So here was the consequence. My character was a human 7th level fighter. Afterwards he was an elf ranger 1/fighter 6.
Another character was an elven wizard who became a half dragon wizard. Finally, the halfling came up. The only change he got was a level in monk rather than 1 of his 7 levels in rogue. Afterwards, the man backed up and said, "He he he, thank ya." and disappeared into the wall behind him. (Just so you know, he was the merchant from Resident Evil 4)


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 Post subject: Re: Your Best D&D Experience
PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2008 6:44 pm 
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Well I've been playing since 1979 and I've had a lot of "Best" experiences. I've had funny, sad, fantastic rolling, fantastic "role"ing. I've played with some great DM's and I've DM'ed some great players.

Trying to describe a best will require some setup for context purposes, so bear with me.

We were playing in a DM created world called Tehrua and were based in a small coastal town of Nork. If any of you have ever played an online fantasy game from the late '90's called the Kingdom of Drakkar (I think its still online), the game creator based the online game on the characters, NPC's and locations from our ongoing AD&D 1ed game.

Any way, I was playing a young Elf fighter who was fairly paladin like in demeanor, after all elf paladin's were not permitted in those days. As it would happen, the DM allowed the character to transform into a Paladin has he leveled up. This character went on to be the highest level character I've ever played (22nd level).

Any way, the town of Nork had some "civilized" orcs as residents and since every time we ran into them they were doing "No Evil" we couldn't just kill them even though they were orcs and well all orcs are evil. The DM took advantage of this and constantly baited us into bar fights or all out plots to get rid of them.

This was years ago and I don't remember all the details, but we some how got the orcs asleep, probably thru buying them too much ale. From their passed out state, we took one of the antagonist orcs and dressed him in a big bib and put a fork and knife in his hands. his pal we put on a platter, placed various vegetables around him, tied his hands and feet back and shoved a big apple in his mouth and placed him in front of his fork/knife bibbed buddy.

Careful placement of a couple of mirrors so they could see themselves as well as the other and a quick splash of water to wake them up translated into two orcs who ran away and we never had another problems with and way too much fun for the character party involved.

Rob


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 Post subject: Re: Your Best D&D Experience
PostPosted: Fri May 02, 2008 1:36 pm 
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Holy moly. The best D&D experience? That will be hard. Nearly every game that I have played or DM’ed has been an awesome experience, so choosing which one is the best is something that won’t be an easy task.

I think the best good time I have had playing D&D (with the most laughs) is when I was DM’ing a small party of lowly adventurers into a underground dungeon crawl. After the party killed a ogre in one of the rooms they found a secret room. The secret room had a long dark tunnel which the “brave” (more known as the low intelligence) fighter started to wander down to see what he could kill.

At the end of the tunnel was a chest which looked quite out of place (some of you may know where this is going). The fighter and his infinite intelligence (8 to be exact) decided to not wait for the rogue to check for traps or anything else and started to open the chest…

Well, little did he know that the chest was a mimic. After his hands got stuck to the mimic and he was banged against the wall a few times did he realize that he could call for help.

Once the rest of the party arrived he was near death and did not look happy. Our cleric runs over and heals the fighter and attempts to pull him off the mimic. Our ranger, decided to summon a hawk in the middle of the room to help attack the mimic. I don’t think he quite got the idea that there was not much room for a bird to fly around. Well during this bird summoning our mage (who I thought was intelligent) decided to cast burning hands and nearly fried everyone in the room, including the bird.

The ranger sent the bird to attack the mimic, which his feathers were already smoking and he was not happy and the bird went into an attack swoop from down the hall. Well when the ranger rolled to hit, he rolled a 1. As the DM I figured I would have fun with this. The party was smoking the mimic was still banging the fighter against the wall. The mage was wondering what to do next because he did not want to kill everyone, so I rolled behind my screen which person the bird would hit.

Well, I rolled the fighter.

I then figured, where is he going to get hit, I gave each party of the body a percentage chance and I rolled (literally) a 100%.

So having fun, the bird, flying as fast as he could in attacking the mimic, decided to miss the mimic and slam directly into the fighters forehead and upon impact the smoldering bird exploded into a puff of feathers and the fighter was knocked unconscious. After the party killed the mimic the fighter woke up and everyone smiled as they looked as his forehead, which now contained a permanent scar of a bird beak and feather imprinted there. The fighter also developed a small fear of birds.
We laughed for quite a while after this and still today, we make fun of our fighter (who is near level 20 now) and his bird beak and feather scar.


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